Feudo d’Ugni’s “D’Ugni” 2007

Standard

In my line of work, I get to taste a lot of different wines. I’m not going to even try to deny that it’s one of the perks. That said, most of the wines tend to fall in the middle of the spectrum: a handful are banal, most are decent, many are good and a few are very good. Just a very small number of the wines I drink are showstopping.

I was at a dinner last night. The first wine was an Italian natural wine so extreme that drinking straight vinegar would almost have been preferable. Next, there was a soulless wine from a leading conventional producer in France. The third wine was a little bit like Goldilocks: there was no off-putting SO2, and it was balanced and pleasant to drink. The fourth wine, though, blew the others out of the water.

It was a magnum of Cristiana Galasso’s top wine “D’Ugni.” I tasted her range at a Vini Veri tasting about three years ago, on the advice of Helena from Colombaia. Sage advice, as always.

Last night, just a splash of this wine was poured into my glass, without me paying any particular attention to the label. It was a casual dinner with friends and winemaker colleagues but bottle exhibitionism wasn’t the focus of the evening. It could go any way. As it happened, I brought the glass up to my nose and inhaled. Time stopped.

There’s an animality to this wine which blows your senses away. No, it’s not reduction, nor any kind of brettanomyces. It’s a noble animality. Meaty, spicy, and pure. I remarked to whoever was listening that red wines from the Veneto just don’t reach this level of aroma intensity. It had to be Montepulciano.

To be honest, you can detect the alcohol content (14.5%) which was probably better masked ten years ago when the wine was made. But I’m nitpicking.

There’s absolutely no question in my mind: this is a perfectly mature wine, which shows delicious tertiary characters without losing its grape variety or its terroir.

The tannins are amazing integrated. There’s no indication of any heavy handed cellar work (either oak barrels, sulphur or chemical trickery.) The wine is simply earnest and genuine.

After that intense animality, you get the full range of savoury Mediterranean flavours: mainly rosemary and black olives, with prunes and cooked berries. Any generous plush fruit has passed on, leaving behind a very graceful, precise wine which is absolutely, utterly, lip-smackingly delicious.

Price: not cheap for sure, but worth it…

Rating: *****


Tasted on 29th and 30th April 2018


If you’re based in the UK, you can buy this wine via the Buon Vino website.

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