Rosé, you say? No, I’m drinking Rossese.

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Gosh, this blog has taken a hit. It’s well-documented that the arrival of a baby can have a disastrous impact on social life, personal hygiene and the like, and I suppose it was always going to be inevitable that I’d have to put the blog on the back burner for a while. The thing is, not only has time been reduced to 3 minute fragments and my drinking been reduced to one small glass with dinner but I’ve also been suffering from a psychological block.

Which wines do I talk about? In the past I’ve always abided by the policy of not writing about wines from wineries with whom I work – unless there’s something really, really noteworthy about them. But in the last year or so, I’ve also been working for the VinNatur association… and the problem is VinNatur is made up of over 200 wineries. Do I not write about any of them?! Ok then, I only write about wines I buy myself? Not a bad solution but consequentially, that probably means writing off the wines I taste at fairs and I love tasting wines at fairs. What about wine other people give me? Hell no, that’s even worse. What about wine that is given to me by people who are not producers or PR pros? Well, that would be ok, I guess…


I’ve found a burst of inspiration to dust off the keyboard because the wine I’m writing about today was given to me by a French-based wine writer who was road-tripping through Italy last summer.

The first part of his road trip took him to Liguria where he picked up a bottle of Rossese 2018 from a winery called Laura Aschero. Beyond that, and the words “Rossese di Riviera Ligure di Ponente DOC” written on the label, I know nothing about this wine and it turns out that not having much context is strangely liberating.

So that brings me to the present; sitting outside on the patio, congratulating myself on the fact that I’ve managed to do most of the household chores AND also put the baby to sleep for long enough that I can sit down and enjoy a glass of wine!

It’s February 7th today and it’s the first day warm enough this year that I’ve been able to sit outside and it’s wonderful feeling the warm sun on my face. The dog is basking in the sunshine too. I can hear the boys working in the vineyard nearby and see a truck with PU plates indicating that the Croatian agronomists have arrived to take away a bundle of prunings for some experiment of theirs.


Rossese is a new variety for me. I haven’t spent much time in Liguria and, as we know, Italy has a myriad of native varieties that are nigh on impossible to find outside the immediate area. I consult Ian D’Agata’s book to learn that there are just 280 hectares planted with Rossese but that despite the low number, it is by far the most dominant red grape in that part of Liguria, by which I mean the western part, around the town of Imperia.

“In Italy, the list of native grapes that strongly mark the territory they are grown in is almost endless, but few do so to the extent of Rossesse. There are no other red varieties of similar relevance in its whole production area, and so for locals Rossesse is a family member of sorts.” (Native Wine Grapes of Italy, Ian D’Agata 2014.)

The most striking thing, at least initially, is the colour; a beautiful, clear, bright, ruby red. It’s exactly the colour that you think red wine is until you realise that actually most red wines are a deep purple hue.

It has a light, fruity nose – wild strawberries – which is charmingly fragrant. It’s so light bodied it’s over half way to becoming a rosé; there are practically no tannins. Ian D’Agata once again comes to the rescue explaining that the Riviera Ligure di Ponente DOC wines are less intense and lighter bodied than its Dolceacqua DOC counterpart.

That certainly seems to be true in this instance. The mouthfeel is thin but elegant. Clearly filtered, but that’s the style and it works perfectly on this warm, sunny day. I feel I’ve stumbled across the Italian equivalent of a good Rosé de Provence.


I unfortunately don’t have a photo of the bottle because as I got to this stage of my tasting notes the baby woke up, causing me also to stir from my reverie. As we all know, you can never take your eyes off a 6 month baby, not even for a minute and so my daaarling husband (can you hear the sarcasm?) was able to pour the last fond de bouteille down the drain and whisk the bottle away, down to the recycling centre before I noticed!

It’s not the first time that’s happened either….. see what happened to the Spessari 2014 here!

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